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crackdown against cyclists

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Sora, May 10, 2007.

  1. Sora

    Sora Basho's companion Admin

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    I have just watched a TV news.

    Today, Tokyo metropolitan police did a large-scale crackdown against illegal cyclists at 96 places.:cop: 7 persons were arrested and 2,114 persons were warned in all around Tokyo. (The news didn't say about the details.)

    Everybody, take care and keep the rule please.
     
  2. thomas

    thomas The Crank Engine Admin

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    Thanks for the heads-up. I fully support the police in their struggle against keitai-using, umbrella-holding, toddler-carrying mama-charri "cyclists" recklessly riding on the wrong side of the road at night without lights... :[taking a deep breath]:

    Thanks, Sora-san! :p
     
  3. Aphex

    Aphex Cruising

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    For me it is interesting to note the above are actually illegal Japan. I`ve just arrived from the UK where cyclists are treated as strictly, if not more so, than motorists. Last summer I got a fine of GBP30.00 (JPY6,000) for runing 7 red lights, it was later waived, but the policeman, who was also on a bicycle, treated it quite seriously. Here however I have had some funny looks for stopping at red lights, and have had a bit of culture shock seeing cyclists ride on the pavement and ride on the wrong side of the road without anyone even shouting abuse at them. Better safe than sorry I guess.
     
  4. thomas

    thomas The Crank Engine Admin

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    Using a keitai or holding an umbrella while riding as well as transporting another person on your bicycle carries - if I remember correctly - a maximum fine of 50.000yen under the Road Traffic Law. So much for legal theory.

    A while ago I saw two police officers on bicycle patrol along Route 15 in Tokyo running several red lights. It was quite obvious that were not in a hurry or "on mission", but simply bored to wait for lights to turn green.
     
  5. nobu☆

    nobu☆ Speeding Up

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    WEBで記事を見つけたので
    ご参考まで・・・
    http://news.goo.ne.jp/article/sankei/nation/m20070510003.html
     
  6. Ash

    Ash Warming-Up

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    ah! Thats interesting! Probably just another one day wonder though...

    Ash
     
  7. rumnyc

    rumnyc Warming-Up

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    What are the rules regarding lights and helmets in tokyo?

    I don't plan on running lights or going the wrong way, but do i need to have front and rear lights? what about helmet? I don't want to ride on the sidewalk though...on the street only.
     
  8. Edogawakikkoman

    Edogawakikkoman Maximum Pace

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    No helmet rules that I know of.
    As far as lights are concerned I think you just need one head light. I'm usually lit up like a Christmas tree so they may bust me for too many lights.

    On the way to work today I saw about 50 cops through about 10different intersections (plus or minus ??). Some of those spots I would normally run a red or at least pre-empt a red I was careful not to give them a reason to stop me but still very paranoid as some of the rules are very grey. I over shot the stop line at one red light and was waiting on the pedestrian crossing. THe cop on the other side was looking at me and I knew he wanted to stop me for some reason.... Having a helmet on, lights here and there and looking serious I don't think he was game. Plus that I'm a gaijin...

    While I was on the road I pretended to be a car while on the side walk I still rode but rode like a 'polite' rider.

    I'm sure they would have stopped me if they'd seen the ipod attached to my arm and head phones in ears but by then I was already flying along to the next intersection....

    Are they going to keep this up for a while? (hope not).
     
  9. AlanW

    AlanW Maximum Pace

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    I don't know the legal requirements - will leave that to a Nihonjin rider to answer.

    However, you'd have to be some kind of mental patient to be out on the road at night with no tail light. It gets dark early and it gets dark quickly. Japanese roads also have many tunnels so it's worth having a tail light on your bike at all times.

    I believe the 'crackdown' is on till the 20th May, and applies to cars too, so watch out if you drive to a ride start point.
     
  10. WhiteGiant

    WhiteGiant Maximum Pace

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    Road rules???

    As yet, it really doesn't look like there are any.
    As for the recent police "crack-down":
    >Thomas: Keitai mailing, riding on the wrong side of the road, at night with no lights mama-chari-riders will probably be the reason I get deported.... It hasn't happened yet, but one day, one of those idiots will run into me, and I think they'll throw me out of the country for "Punching a 'National' in the face".
    >Edogawakikkoman: Very good point! I've been through quite a lot of intersections recently, and seen the police out there "looking" for the adverse cyclist; BUT as long as you're wearing a helmet and looking serious, they usually don't even give you a second glance. I don't think the "crack-down" is against road-bike-riders, so much as against irresponsible mama-chari-fools who think it's "Nandemo-Ari / Anything goes!"
    >AlanW: Lights! You're absolutely right... The rear flasher is a NECESSITY at night.
    Considering that most Japanese drivers are as good as their mama-chari counterparts, it's best to be as visible as possible from behind at night.
    As "Edogawakikkoman" said; light yourself up like a Christmas tree!

    Finally (and I've written it in a different thread), any new bike laws in this country should be about "HELMETS" - IF you want to ride on the sidewalk, you can leave your helmet at home; but if you want to ride on the road, then put a F&@KING helmet on your head!!!
    It seems like such a sensible solution to all the problems right now. If the police see a cyclist on the road without a helmet, they should "book 'em, Danno!", and leave the rest be. And if a cyclist forgets to take his/her helmet, "STAY ON THE BLOODY SIDEWALK, AND GET OFF THE ROAD!"
    How easy is that?
    Travis
     
  11. Edogawakikkoman

    Edogawakikkoman Maximum Pace

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    All more good points.

    My son has to wear a helmet to school but he refuses to wear it o weekends to school club.
    I'm going to have a word with the Principal to make the rule for club as well. No helmet---don't ride to school.

    No cops today but plenty of those old retired people in military style unifrom who must volunteer to watch the kids cross the intersections. More than usual....

    (I drove to work today---rest day) :eek: A bit knackered..... :eek:uch:
     
  12. kiwisimon

    kiwisimon Maximum Pace

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    Interesting cause in New Zealand all riders must (A) wear helmets
    (B) ride on the road except very small kids.
    The jury on the helmet law is probably on the side of negative. This is of course for all riders in the general population and many ppl just gave up riding rather than buying a helmet.
    Quote from research paper
    "Opponents of compulsory helmet legislation may have a point: the accumulating evidence suggests that the reduction in head injuries expected of legislation may not be as large as anticipated in practice - and may in fact be outweighed by the disbenefits because of reduced levels of cycling."
     
  13. Aphex

    Aphex Cruising

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    Here`s my penny`sworth on the helmet debate:

    I don`t think legislation is the best solution, look at how many road laws are broken with impunity in this predominantly law-abiding country. The best way forward to is for the cycling fraternity to make helmet wear the norm. The group I rode MTB with in England wouldn`t take non-helmet wearers, this sort of peer pressure is useful, as is making it socially unacceptable. Twenty-five years ago in th UK, it was illegal, yet socially acceptable, to drink-drive. Now admitting to driving under the influence is considered worse than taking pills and powders at the weekend. Point taken about less takeup of cycling if helmets are made compulsory.

    I just did my first reasonable length trip in Japan yesterday, here are some of the things that struck me:
    Other two-wheelers are as dangerous as drivers. Especially those pesky wrong side of the road brigade and the motorbikers who undertake. I had an altercation with one guy who squeezed past me on his motorcross bike and signalled me to use the pavement! The cheek of it. At least UK bikers, though aggressive, lay their own life on the line by overtaking on the outside.
    On the whole though I was glad to see the volume of two-wheeled traffic. In the UK cycling is a wierdo subculture, or a fanatic`s sport. Just the fact that women get on their bikes, made-up and dressed to go out in the evening is a positive thing I think.

    Lastly I have a question to throw into the arena:

    Yesterday in Kobe on the ramp of a dual carrigeway a truck screamed past me with about a foot between my head and his wingmirror and came to screeching halt at the next lights. When I caught up with him, I looked in and asked him:  俺を殺す気か?He looked really pissed off, tried to stare me down, but said nothing, he was smaller than me and looked straight outta high school. He eventually bowed and acknowledged my point after I had opened his passenger door an shouted at him to make some response. I know what I did was probably too agressive, and could have got me in trouble if he had had a mate beside him and they had been from Minami Osaka :p , but what do you people do? I feel I gotta let the driver know what they did was dangerous, otherwise they won`t know, Maybe the answer is I just need to do it in a more concilatory manner. Basically the above episode is typical of what I have been doing for years in London, but maybe in a new country I need to re-consider my tactics. Any thoughts?
     
  14. Edogawakikkoman

    Edogawakikkoman Maximum Pace

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    Roid road rage?
    :D


    EPO?

    Extremly Pissed Off?

    I had a few close calls with some mirrors on trucks this week too. I'm going to wait till they actually bump me before I rip it off and put my cleats through it...
     
  15. Ash

    Ash Warming-Up

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    Yes bro, I am with you on this one. In australia it is mandatory, but I dont think it is necessary to make everyone on a mama chari going 2 minutes down the road to a supermarket wear a helmet. That being said, all kids should have to wear one I think, if they are on the back and mama slips and drops the bike that is a fractured skull for sure. People like us on road bikes should also wear one, and I think peer pressure is the best way like you say.

    I nearly got taken out by a mama chari on Monday, she suddenly left the sidewalk and swerved onto the road without looking. :eek: I was going about 40kph down shinmejirodori at the time! I think mama chari's are more a threat to people like us than they are to themselves....
     
  16. Triroo

    Triroo Warming-Up

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    Another one bites the pavement

    Hello to all,

    Just got my right arm back in action, for typing (Right clavicle is still mending) had a guy rear end me last Monday night on the way home.
    Thanks to my helmet and some luck, no one ran me over in the intersection.
    Oh the guy that hit me , haulled ass and never stopped to say sorry..

    I ride with three lights on the back and one in front, all that and I still get taken out. So lesson learned, never think your safe, my comute is 80k a day and most of it is on busy roads with hundreds of lights... Red light is a mere caution to the aggressive Japanese & Gaijin drivers. I am sure my accident was nothing special to the cops, just another bike getting in the way on the road.

    I am just happy it was on my 50k flat bar... that thing is a tank and all in need is a new set of lights and a new computer... and a back wheel..

    SO be safe out there, May is safety month, notice the yellow tents all over the intersections, the cops are out in forces, but still a sleep. My neighborhood policeman says the bike issue is still up in the air, just to many people on bikes on the street and on the sidewalks.... so life just goes on.

    Jeff
     
  17. Naoko

    Naoko Warming-Up

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  18. Ash

    Ash Warming-Up

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    ah mate, hope you are feeling better soon. All of us know the feeling and sympathise.

    Get well soon.

    Ash

    thanks for posting this though, it is always good to reinforce the helmet message!
     
  19. TODO R CASPELL

    TODO R CASPELL Maximum Pace

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    Omari san / ignorant gaijin

    Samasen omarari san domo arigato SMILE & BOW when it becomes clear that is about all my Japanese and we have exhausted all their english I am on my way. Some respect and a smile goes a long way.


    BTW. PLEASE not the helmet thing. I have nothing against them. YOU can wear one all you want. BUT the more the safety Nazi's pass laws and nag at me the less inclined I am to wear one.
     
  20. marc

    marc Speeding Up

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    Apologies if this is already common knowledge, but I recently picked up a bit of traffic law info from a passing officer that was previously unaware of.

    :cop:

    I was riding up one of the one-way streets around Ningyocho in the right-hand lane (but in the direction of the traffic flow). At a red light, a policeman pulled up beside me and waved me over, and told me that bikes have to ride on the left hand side, even on one-way streets. When the light changed, he told me to be careful and we both went on our ways.

    I guess since many of the one-way streets have signs saying that bicycles are allowed to ride both ways (this street didn't), it would make sense that they have to treat them as two-way streets with regard to which side they ride on. Anyway, I'm making sure to observe that rule from now on.

    Of course, while he was talking to me, a mama-chari went sailing past us, on the wrong side of the road and right through the red light. :susp:
     

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