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Help The Helpful Thread

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by theBlob, Mar 2, 2014.

  1. Winston Leg-Thigh

    Winston Leg-Thigh Speeding Up

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    Thanks for the info - the shed does get hot although I only put the tyres on in October last year so they missed the worst of the heat. I usually ride with the tyres 85/95 or 90/100 so I don't think they're over-inflated, but I'm sure they've fallen below 80psi while they're sitting there during the week.

    On the subject of tyres, I replaced the 4 seasons with a pair of Lifeline Prime Race and while they're good in the dry and on good roads in the wet, I had a couple of dodgy moments with them on some slimy forest roads and then lost it completely on a patch of mud at the weekend. So I'm in the market for a new set of tyres if anyone has any recommendations (25 or 28mm clincher, year-round, all-weather). Cheers
     
  2. macrophotofly

    macrophotofly Maximum Pace

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    The conti 4-seasons have a lot of grip so getting anything as grippy as them is a challenge, but you can't go wrong with GP4000's in my opinion for normal road riding. Sounds like you might a little more off road (slime/mud) than me so if you can fit them with your frame perhaps consider some Schwalbe G-ones
     
  3. leicaman

    leicaman Maximum Pace
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    Sounds like you would have lost traction no matter what tyres you were on. Still, can't go wrong with conti GP4000 unless you are hitting some rougher stuff, in which case the side walls aren't the strongest.

    A few guys on here ride panaracer gravel kings and really like them. 26mm would be nice. They won't break the bank either.
     
  4. D'Pioneer

    D'Pioneer Far beyond the black horizon

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    @Winston Leg-Thigh

    Your tyres perished because of the way you store them, as has been pointed out already. The issue is not inflation pressure, but rather the extremes that your storage location presents to the material; extreme cold, followed by extreme heat, in combination with being inflated and deflated, results in cracking.

    From 'Effects of Extreme Arctic Cold on Materials',

    "The general effect of reduced temperatures is the same for all rubber-like materials. As the temperature is decreased the rubber passes from a soft(easily deformed) and elastic state to a more rigid state and finally to a brittle glasslike condition."

    So, keep your bike in your house, and not your shed.
     
  5. theBlob

    theBlob Bokeh master
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    I keep my bike in my car which has the same if not increased in the case of summer conditions as outside. I've never had a tyre disintegrate due to temperature variance. I think the effect is amplified with tyres of greater thickness this greater rigidity to start with.
     
  6. Winston Leg-Thigh

    Winston Leg-Thigh Speeding Up

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    @macrophotofly - shame they don't make the G- ones a bit narrower.

    @leicaman - I think I'll give the gravel kings a go - maybe even 28mm.

    @D'Pioneer - haha, I think there's probably more extremes in temperature in the house, although if I have to go down that route new tyres every six months is still cheaper than a divorce.

    @theBlob - yeah - there's a couple of other bikes in the shed (all with cheapo tyres on) and none have suffered any problems over far longer periods of time.
     
  7. wexford

    wexford Maximum Pace
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    My brand spanking new industrial fan arrived! Just set it up and sat on the bike. I know it is cooler tonight but that thing gets a lot of air directly on you. This just might work! Should be good for pre and post shower cool downs also.
     
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  8. GrantT

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    Good stuff! Take note that if it's the same as mine, the highest setting is nearest to "off". Indoors I imagine the air could get very muggy too (all that airborne sweat), so maybe open a window or door and aim your other fan at it. And, as few clothes as possible. ;)
     
  9. wexford

    wexford Maximum Pace
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    Yeah. I noticed that the first time I thought I'd try for even more wind and was a bit let down by the loss in power as I already had it on the highest setting. But still pretty good. Used it after a run now also and it was almost cold! Didn't have the continued sweat problem so that was nice! problem solved. Did 45 minutes on the rollers with it also and while I sweat, I sweat less. I think my towels were in the way a little though so will try something else next time. So far, so like!
     
  10. Karl

    Karl Maximum Pace

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    Couple of questions...

    1. I've had 2 aluminum frame bikes end up with cracks. One almost immediately, the second after 9 years of use (mostly commuting). I've never had a steel frame fall apart on me, and still have my 1989 Panasonic in good working order. Question... am I wrong to expect an aluminum frame to last beyond 8 years?

    2. Based on the fact my bike is breaking apart, I'm in the market for a new one. I see that Canyon has the same bike with two different choices for front chainrings.. 34/52 or 36/46. I'm not a speed demon. I just like to get outside, go up in the mountains and enjoy the physical activity and nature while I get some exercise. My current bike is 34/52 and suits me well, but can't say I have too many opportunities, given the riding I do, to use the top gears. Also, a bit of knee issue, so lower gearing in the mountain helps keep them happy. Question: Would I be likely to regret getting a 36/46?
     
  11. theBlob

    theBlob Bokeh master
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    Doesn't seem like a good ratio to me. 46 on the front will leave you wanting on descents and with any kind of group riding at speed. And 36 is alright for the steep mountains around Tokyo but 34 is better. 34/50 is a better configuration.
     
  12. Half-Fast Mike

    Half-Fast Mike Maximum Pace

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    Like anything, it depends how it's used and how well it was made in the first place. My first two road frames were Y's Road own-brand Antales (sic). Each lasted less than 4 months of commuting and group rides before the BB tore off. They were replaced under warranty but after the second one I took the shop's advice and coughed up a few dollars more for a Panaracer steel frame. That was 2006 and the steelie-beastie has defied all my unwitting attempts to destroy it.
     
  13. Karl

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    Yep. That's what I was thinking too. Problem is, the color scheme on the 34/50 is not my cup of tea. Kind of a lime green thing going on.
     
  14. Karl

    Karl Maximum Pace

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    So far, I've never had a steel frame give up the ghost, and the ride seems much smoother. Canyon doesn't make a steel frame and I've lost my trust in the longevity of aluminum, so thinking of going to the Trek 520 disc. At some point in the future, I hope to do some bike touring in Europe so the 520 would probably work well for my weekend rides here and touring as well. Hopefully I can pick up a good deal on one in the fall.
     
  15. theBlob

    theBlob Bokeh master
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    You can just buy the frame and groupset separately of course...?

     
  16. D'Pioneer

    D'Pioneer Far beyond the black horizon

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    Which bike is this?
     
  17. Karl

    Karl Maximum Pace

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    I didn't see a 'frame only' choice on the web site for the Inflite AL 9.

    OTOH, I'm kinda bummed that my Felt AL frame is cracking, even after 9 years of use. My first Felt split shortly after I purchased it, so got a replacement. OK, so it's been 9 years and thousands of miles in lots of different weather conditions... but, darn it, I tend to keep my bikes in good shape and expect them to last. Sooooo.... I'm thinking on giving up on an AL replacement frame and staying with steel.
     
  18. Karl

    Karl Maximum Pace

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    I was looking at the Inflite AL 9. Has a nice looking red and black frame, or a puke green one.
     
  19. leicaman

    leicaman Maximum Pace
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    The bike you are looking at is a CX bike. That's why it has a 36/46 chainset.

    Sounds like you had a good run with your Felt. 9 years and thousands of miles is more than most bikes do for their owners. Perhaps it deserves its retirement , and you a shiny new bike.

    How tall are you?

    Why don't you buy a nice steel frame and swap all your felt parts on to it, or really treat yourself and get all new components too.
     
  20. Karl

    Karl Maximum Pace

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    The Felt is a 9 speed and its getting harder to find 9 speed stuff so probably a good time to upgrade anyway. Otherwise, I'd probably swap things out.

    I'm just short of 6'. Usually take a 56 or 57 frame.

    Went to the Trek store out in Sagamiono the other day and they don't have the 520 steel frame. Bummer. My Japanese is not great but when I asked about ordering, it seemed like it would be very 'difficult'. Double bummer.
     

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